Part of the reason for Emma Kirkland's push to designate Revelstoke as a ski resort area is that youth bands

Part of the reason for Emma Kirkland's push to designate Revelstoke as a ski resort area is that youth bands

Last Drop leading push to change Revelstoke’s liquor license designation

A movement is underfoot to have the entire City of Revelstoke designated as a ski resort area so that minors can be allowed into pubs and bars – as long as they’re accompanied by an adult and it’s before 8 p.m.

“I think the town and the community will benefit from it,” said Emma Kirkland, manager of the Last Drop, who is spearheading the movement.

She said it started when the Last Drop switched from a food primary to a liquor primary license last Fall, the result of a past violation. The switch meant the pub could not let minors enter, which meant they could no longer have kids bands play at the pub and also caused confusion amongst tourist families.

“We get tourists who don’t understand why they can’t bring their kids in because in Australia and Europe kids are allowed to go into pubs before a certain time at night,” she said.

After a bit of research, she learned of an exemption allowed in downhill ski resort areas that lets minors into bars, provided they’re accompanied by a parent and guardian and leave by 8 p.m.

The B.C. Liquor Licensing Branch (LLB) sets out the following policy for permitting minors in a liquor primary area at a ski resort:

“To be eligible the resort must:

– provide amenities for skiers;

– be located at a ski hill developed for downhill skiing; and

– the liquor-primary establishment must be located in the ski resort area.”

Kirkland is arguing that the entire city, since its where skiers sleep, eat and shop, should be recognized as part of the ski resort area, however, she added the LLB does not recognize it as such.

She said she has the support of the Regent Hotel and is looking to get other groups such as the Chamber of Commerce and city council on board with her lobbying efforts in the coming weeks.

“The whole community benefits,” she said. “It wouldn’t be a forced thing but during the day, if kids can go in, kids can go in.”