Black Press files                                Discarded election signs at the Langley Township public works yard in 2018.

Black Press files Discarded election signs at the Langley Township public works yard in 2018.

No cash, no election sign policy pondered by B.C. city

A deposit could be required to put up election signs in 2022.

Langley Township and school board candidates might have to put down a $500 deposit for the right to raise election signs starting in 2022.

On Monday night, Township council will debate a new bylaw that will revamp the rules for election signs.

In July, Township council voted to place a 20-day limit on advertising via roadside signs – though the new limit wasn’t set to take effect during last fall’s local election.

The new bylaw also incorporates some suggestions from Township staff based on their experiences with the recent vote, and that’s why the deposit might be required in the future.

Last fall, Township staff picked up at least 600 election signs after the four-day grace period following the election, said Bill Storie, manager of community and council initiatives.

That was just by bylaw officers, Storie said. Operations workers with the Township also picked up signs as they went about their work driving around the community, but didn’t record the numbers.

The report from Township staffers recommends a fee to cover the pick up of election signs that are either placed in violation of the rules, or which are not picked up by candidates after the vote and have to be hauled away by municipal workers.

“The October 2018 campaign saw a significant use of staff resources to both pick up improperly placed signs prior to Election Day and retrieve signs after the allowable placement date limit of four days post General Election Day,” said the report on the new bylaw.

To save on staff time and money, the new bylaw would require any candidate or political organization planning to post signs to put down a $500 refundable deposit before they can put signs along roadways.

For each time a sign has to be picked up by the Township, $25 is to be deducted from the deposit.

The new rules are also ban placing signs in front of schools or school board property, and ban the use of reflective tape or stickers on signs.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Revelstoke City Hall. (File)
Revelstoke COVID-19 cases spike to 46

Mayor Gary Sulz expects positive cases to increase

Downtown Revelstoke. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)
Online community launched to support local businesses

Community Futures is hosting Revy Open for Business as a one stop shop for information

Nicole Cherlet was elected to Revelstoke city council two years ago. (Jocelyn Doll - Revelstoke Review)
2 year anniversary: Nicole Cherlet is striving for tangible change

As council looks back on their first two years in office, a byelection looms

Mike Brooks-Hill was elected to city council two years ago. (Contributed)
2 year anniversary: Mike Brooks-Hill says change is inevitable

As council looks back on their first two years in office, a byelection looms

Jackie Rhind was elected to Revelstoke city council two year ago. (Contributed)
2 year anniversary: Jackie Rhind advises relying on your values

As council looks back on their first two years in office, a byelection looms

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

The stage will be full as the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra takes the stage with Verdi’s Requiem - 2019, file photo (OSO photo)
Okanagan Symphony launches new season amid COVID-19

The new season will be live-streamed starting in 2021

The scene of a serious crash on Highway 33 in Kelowna that killed one and severely injured two others on June 20, 2018. (File)
Trial begins for driver accused of fatal 2018 Highway 33 crash in Kelowna

An officer who pursued the vehicle said he saw the occupants of the car ejected upon impact

Ash and Lisa Van carry a freshly cut Christmas tree while wearing personal protective masks at a Christmas Tree Farm in Egbert, Ontario, Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020 THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Cole Burston
‘Everyone wants a tree and they want it now’: Christmas tree sales on pace for record

Anticipated demand for Christmas trees has sparked a rush by some to purchase more trees wholesale

Jessie Simpson’s mother is asking for Christmas cards to cheer her son up this holiday season. (Sue Simpson - Facebook)
Kamloops mom asking for Christmas cards for son

Jessie Simpson was beaten with a baseball bat in 2016 and now lives in a long-term care facility

Business groups have been advocating for years that local approvals for construction in B.C. are too long and restricted, and that B.C.’s outdates sales tax deter business investment. (Black Press Media file photo)
B.C. residents worried about COVID-19 deficit, business survey finds

Respondents support faster local approvals, value added tax

The first of two earthquakes near Alaska on the morning of Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020, is shown in blue. (USGS)
No tsunami risk after two earthquakes near Alaska

Both earthquakes hit near the U.S. state on Dec. 1

Mike Miltimore of Lee’s Music said the Gretsch electric guitar brought into his store is from 1955 and similar to one played by country music legend Chet Atkins before he developed his signature series of guitars. (Mike Miltmore photo)
Rare guitar touches a chord with connection to Salmon Arm family’s past

1950s Gretsch, worth up to $26,000, belonged to resident Sherrie Favell

RCMP are offering some helpful ways to send the Grinch home empty handed this holiday season. (Vernon-North Okanagan RCMP)
‘Tis the season to protect your packages: North Okanagan RCMP

Send the Grinch home empty handed this Christmas season

Most Read