Development Services staff at city hall will have another tool in their tool box once the amendments allowing for a Temporary Use Permit are adopted. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Development Services staff at city hall will have another tool in their tool box once the amendments allowing for a Temporary Use Permit are adopted. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Revelstoke City Council approves Temporary Use Permits

Councillors Cody Younker and Steven Cross voted against the ammendments

After much debate, Revelstoke City Council passed third reading of the proposed Temporary Use Permit.

The new permit required amendments to the Zoning Bylaw as well as the Official Community Plan.

A public hearing was hosted on the issue at the council meeting on Nov. 12.

Residents raised concerns about the new permit being a way to avoid the process required by a development permit, as well as potential abuse of the system.

“In my background I am always worried when you have two processes that are doing substantially the same thing,” said Bob Dale, Revelstoke resident. “It invariably introduces confusion to both sides.”

Temporary Use Permits are a tool for the planning department to use that would allows them to approve a proposal in an area that is not currently zoned for that use.

READ MORE: Temporary Cold Weather Shelter in the works for Revelstoke

Each permit would have to be approved by city council and go through a public engagement process, including a public hearing and the maximum amount of time a permit can be issued for is three years, with the option to renew for the maximum of another three years.

However, Marianne Wade, director of development services said, there are a variety of combinations when it comes to the timeline. For example, council could approve a permit for one year and if it comes up for renewal, another three years, or any combination they so choose.

Wade also attempted to dispel council and resident’s concerns that the permit would be abused, by explaining that staff would look at each proposal carefully and if it was not suited for a temporary use permit, they would recommend it move forward as a development permit.

She also said that having a Temporary Use Permit system would be a part of the zoning bylaw if she could wave a magic wand and update it all right now.

Councillors Steven Cross and Cody Younker voted against the motion.

Cross said he has seen city council in other cities vote in favour of the common good without considering the needs of those who are directly impacted too often, and he worried that Temporary Use Permits would go the same direction.

Younker said he was concerned that the city’s bylaw officers would not have the capacity to enforce the requirements of the permits if they were being broken.

READ MORE: Revelstoke City Council considering giving themselves a raise

Residents also suggested that investment in Revelstoke would decrease if the proposed system was approved, saying that a zoning bylaw provides certainty in what your neighbours will be, while a Temporary Use Permit could see a neighbourhood change drastically.

On the other hand, Adrian Giacca, a developer who would like to see micro-housing in Revelstoke, spoke in favour of the permit, saying it would give him an opportunity to move forward and test his ideas.

In the end Mayor Gary Sulz and councillors Nicole Cherlet, Michael Brooks-Hill, Rob Elliott and Jackie Rhind voted in favour with Cross and Younker against.

“I definitely think our world is becoming more complex so any tools that we have to become more flexible and adaptible as a community are probably good things to have at our disposal,” Rhind said.

The amendments have been sent to the province for approval and then they will come back to council for adoption.


 

@JDoll_Revy
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Pixabay photo)
Morning Start: Kentucky has more bourbon than people

Your morning start for Thursday, May 6, 2021

A woman wears a face mask and shield to curb the spread of COVID-19 while walking in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, January 6, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
57 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health region

Thirty people in the region are in hospital, 16 of whom are in intensive care

Grizzly bear. (File)
Malakwa man bitten by grizzly bear on dog walk

The man and dogs were not seriously injured

The downtown kiosks were recently painted black. Tourism Revelstoke said decals still need to be added and information inside the kiosks will also be updated. The city said the black paint is temporary as the area is slotted to be completely revamped in the coming years. (Liam Harrap - Revelstoke Review)
Newly painted black Revelstoke kiosks temporary fix; city

The recent colour changed caused an uproar on Facebook

Protesters attempt to stop clear-cutting of old-growth trees in Fairy Creek near Port Renfrew. (Will O���Connell photo)
VIDEO: Workers, activists clash at site of Vancouver Island logging operation

Forest license holders asking for independent investigation into incident

Flow Academy is located at 1511 Sutherland Avenue in Kelowna. (Michael Rodriguez/Capital News)
Interior Health locks out Kelowna martial arts gym following COVID violations

Actions were taken after all other steps to gain compliance were exhausted, says health authority

A man who allegedly spat at and yelled racial slurs at an Asian family was arrested for hate-motivated assault Tuesday. (Black Press Media file photo)
Arrest made after man spits, yells anti-Asian racial slurs at Victoria mom and kids

The man was arrested for hate-motivated assault near Quadra Elementary School Tuesday

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

A lady wears a vaccinated sticker after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Canada may find it challenging to reach herd immunity from COVID-19, experts say

Level of immunity among the population changes with the variants, especially the more transmissible strains

B.C.’s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Dip in COVID-19 cases with 572 newly announced in B.C.

No new deaths have been reported but hospitalized patients are up to 481, with 161 being treated in intensive care

(Kingfisher Boats photo)
In the market for a boat in the North Okanagan? Be prepared to wait

Vernon’s Kingfisher Boats is out of 2021 models, with many 2022 models already pre-sold

Solar panels on a parking garage at the University of B.C. will be used to separate water into oxygen and hydrogen, the latter captured to supply a vehicle filling station. (UBC video)
UBC parkade project to use solar energy for hydrogen vehicles

Demonstration project gets $5.6M in low-carbon fuel credits

Most Read